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White to play and mate in ive moves
“he Charm”
A Collection of
TWO HUNDRED CHESS PROBLEMS
composed by
Frank Healey
including the problems to which the prizes
were awarded by the committees of the
Era,
the Manchester, the Birmingham, and the
Bristol chess problem tournaments
ACCOMPANIED BY SOLUTIONS
[

1866

]
An Electronic Edition
Anders hulin, Malmö · 2005-12-09
TO
Henry Waite, Esq.,
THE LIBERAL PATRON OF CHESS,
this collection of chess problems
is respectfully inscribed by
the author
PREFACE
In ofering this collection of problems to the Chess community, I feel
that a few prefatory words are required by way of explanation. Several
previous composers have come before the public in the same manner,
among whom I may enumerate Mr. Kling, Mr. Brown of Leeds, and J. B.
of Bridport. heir example has given me conidence, and I venture to
hope that the present collection will be found to bear some features
especially distinctive of English problems, such as may justify my pub-
lishing it in a separate form.
It is certain that the great body of Chess amateurs have always felt
an especial interest in the composition and solution of problems. For
ten persons who take up a magazine or newspaper to examine a game,
probably a hundred may be found who only look to the problems. How
often do we see a man of powerful brain devoting a spare half hour to
the careful scrutiny of a diagram in the
Illustrated London News.
his
study is rewarded by that legitimate gratiication which the successful
exertion of the intellect always brings with it. But the same man would
not, and could not, have devoted the necessary time and energy to a
diicult contest over the board.
he innumerable solutions of those problems constantly forwarded
to the
Era,
the
Illustrated London News,
the
Field,
and many other news-
papers, all agree with one consent in the same story, viz., the increasing
popularity of problem making and solving.
Problems are indeed the poetry of Chess. he same depth of imagi-
nation, the same quick perception of the beautiful, the same fecundity
of invention, which we demand from the poet, are to be found, under
a diferent form, in the humble labours of the problematist. Surely,
without pressing the analogy too far, we may say that the thirty-two
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